You can manage knee pain

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If you find yourself suffering from anterior knee pain, you’ll certainly know. It’s a general term that covers pain around and just behind the kneecap. It can also be caused by problems with the thigh muscles as they help the knee to bend and straighten, and is more common if you are overweight or a sportsperson.

knee pain

Sitting for long periods in one position, climbing stairs, running and kneeling become difficult. I suffer from time to time following a sprained knee way back in 1996. Having trained in massage certainly helped when my injury first happened as my knee locked. As well as searing pain, I couldn’t stand up and there was no-one to help me.

With a little manipulation and a bit of swearing, I managed to free it. Unfortunately, my job involves squatting and kneeling most of the time. I teach first aid and I do first aid. On some days, I can’t kneel or weightbear through it and the thought of being unable to kneel or need a cushion one day genuinely worries me.

However, it only rarely hurts to kneel and only locks occasionally, and other than only being able to cycle a couple of miles at a time, I get by. I follow some simple rules and manage most days to be pain free. When the pain flares up, RICE helps – rest, ice, comfortable support and elevation. Ten minutes or so with a cold compress will help, along with talking to your GP about appropriate anti-inflammatories, pain killers and when to use heat.

I also do gentle non-weight bearing exercises for a few minutes every day on my bed. There are so many things that can help, including physiotherapy, medication, surgery, TENS pain control machines, less strenuous activity and losing weight. Talk to your GP.